Max-Reps: Squats

Quickly measure and calculate your endurance

Squats measured in terms of number of repetitions is an excellent measure of lower body muscular endurance. This is an excellent assessment to be used before advancing to more complex movements such as the Back Squat.

Max-Reps: Squats Protocol

Purpose

Evaluate the ability of the lower body and core muscle groups to sustain repeated contractions against body weight resistance for an extended period of time or until failure.

Equipment

Chair or box (approximately same height as participant’s knees)

Procedure

Instruct the participant to stand in front of the box with feet slightly outside of their shoulders and forward. Cue him or her to take in a deep breath at the top, begin to lower the body in by flexing at the knee and hip joints, pushing the gluteals out, and keeping weight on the heels, in one fluid motion. The bottom of the squat is reached when the upper legs are parallel to the ground, the lower leg and spine are parallel. On the up phase, instruct him or her to concentrically contract the gluteals, driving hips forward to raise the body while breathing out. Repetitions should be completed until their body fatigues and can not perform correct technique.

Max-Reps: Squats Calculation

yrs
reps

Calculation Result

DATE -
Squats (Max-Reps) -
Max-Reps Classification -

Max-Reps: Squats Classification Chart

Male: 18-25 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 24
Poor 25 30
Below average 31 34
Average 35 38
Above average 39 43
Good 44 49
Excellent 50 > 50

Male: 26-35 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 21
Poor 22 28
Below average 29 30
Average 31 34
Above average 35 39
Good 40 45
Excellent 46 > 46

Male: 36-45 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 16
Poor 17 22
Below average 23 26
Average 27 29
Above average 30 34
Good 35 41
Excellent 42 > 42

Male: 46-55 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 12
Poor 13 17
Below average 18 21
Average 22 24
Above average 25 28
Good 29 35
Excellent 36 > 36

Male: 56-65 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 8
Poor 9 12
Below average 13 16
Average 17 20
Above average 21 24
Good 25 31
Excellent 32 > 32

Male: > 65 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 6
Poor 7 10
Below average 11 14
Average 15 18
Above average 19 21
Good 22 28
Excellent 29 > 29

Female: 18-25 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 17
Poor 18 24
Below average 25 28
Average 29 32
Above average 33 36
Good 37 43
Excellent 44 > 44

Female: 26-35 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 12
Poor 13 20
Below average 21 24
Average 25 28
Above average 29 32
Good 33 39
Excellent 40 > 40

Female: 36-45 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 6
Poor 7 14
Below average 15 18
Average 19 22
Above average 23 26
Good 27 33
Excellent 34 > 34

Female: 46-55 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 4
Poor 5 9
Below average 10 13
Average 14 17
Above average 18 21
Good 22 27
Excellent 28 > 28

Female: 56-65 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 2
Poor 3 6
Below average 7 9
Average 10 12
Above average 13 17
Good 18 24
Excellent 25 > 25

Female: > 65 y/o

CLASSIFICATION FROM TO
Very Poor 0 1
Poor 2 4
Below average 5 10
Average 11 13
Above average 14 16
Good 17 23
Excellent 24 > 24

A Powerful Platform for Personal Training Analytics

Sign up for a 30-day free trial and discover a new way to analyze and report.