what-is-my-vo2max-trainermetrics Client Tips

What Is My VO2max?

How often do you walk into the gym and go straight to the cardio equipment to either start warming up or begin your workout? Now how off do you ask yourself “What is my VO2max” prior to walking in the gym? Hardly ever right?  Measuring your cardiovascular fitness might as well be just as important as stepping on the scale if you find yourself always running for a workout. Most of us dread walking up to the cardio floor knowing we are just about to move our legs as fast as we can, back and forth, while staying in place for 30 minutes.  Its boring, it hurts, and where is the sense of accomplishment?

Would you prefer to do your conditioning with a purpose?  How would you feel if you found out that your cardiovascular system is poor but your body fat %  is excellent? Its almost counter-productive right? Well just like 4th grade P.E. class you can measure your cardiovascular efficiency by simply running the mile and a half…or walking a mile, or stepping up on a platform, or running on a treadmill. Its that easy.

If you don’t think your cardiovascular efficiency is where it needs to be, just pick what assessment you feel you can accomplish with out stopping.  By simply using the TRAINERMETRICS web application:

  • Selecting the “Cardiovascular” tab
  • and clicking “Add Data.”
  • Pick either walk, step, run, or bruce treadmill test based on your level of competency
  • and click “Add Data”

Your resulting VO2max measures your aerobic fitness by estimating your body’s ability to deliver and extract oxygen from muscle tissue. Kind of important therefore you might as well take your cardiovascular health and fitness seriously.  We recommend assessing your VO2max at least once a month and programming your “cardio” training or “conditioning” based off of your results.

Instead of warming up with a jog, knock out your corrective exercises from our overhead squat assessment, complete your lifts, and finish up with high intensity cardio intervals calculated from the “Target Heart Rate Zones” table.



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